PAZA in Transition

April Dye Day

April was a frenzied bittersweet month for the Club de Artesanas (CdA) members and the weavers of the Centro de Artesanía, Huancarani (CAH). Emotions were held in check by the need for action to vacate PAZA headquarters within 3 weeks. Two dye days and a soap making day were squeezed in as well. Doña Maxima and Doña Antonia wasted no time in locating another space a block away which they had repainted and with the help of Doña Beatris and Vilma turned into CdA´s new workshop/store. The goal is for the space to be used to create products that will sell locally. Doña Maxima will hold regular hours two mornings a week so local women wishing to learn how to weave can learn on a drop-by basis. She will continue to open the store on Sunday mornings for the Huancarani weavers.

Breny Explaining Changes

PAZA held a meeting in Huancarani on April 4th to answer questions about the abrupt change in routine with Dorinda moving to the U.S. and Doña Maxima taking on the leadership role. A million thanks to Breny Ugarte who miraculously managed to hitch a ride from Cochabamba to Huancarani in time to facilitate and translate the Spanish to Quechua. There were tears because the weavers haven´t realized that they don´t need constant foreign influence to carry on. Faces brightened as Breny explained the bonus program for master weavers to teach younger women to weave. Each weaver present promised to teach 1 younger weaver. Doña Casimira was so excited she stated that she will not retire from weaving after all and will teach as well.

Maribel Proudly Displays Her 1st Faja

The following Sunday Maribel, who at 21 is the youngest CAH weaver, arrived at the PAZA workshop/store with teen Angelica in tow. Angelica is the 1st bonus program student and is learning to weave from her partner´s aunt. Maribel had brought in a yoga mat strap and wanted to show Angelica how to work with Doña Maxima in turning in a weaving for payment. Maribel left with the CAH file of paperwork in her bag and the responsibility to keep it up to date. Dorinda had fulfilled the Secretary role at the request of past CAH Secretaries who had not had the opportunity to learn to read or write.

The Chicas Working Cross Stitch on Bags with Rebecca, 2017

The CdA women, chicas, kids and past members spent time reminiscing about the volunteers which made taking down the “Volunteer Photo Wall” a fun affair with laughter instead of tears. The photos were fairly divvied up. The cross stitch projects with Rebecca and embroidery work with Surya were mentioned by all of the chicas. Emily broke out in song with the chorus of “La Cucaracha” that she had learned from José a volunteer from Mexico. Stories of Amanda´s 5 years of jewelry making workshops were shared between the women, chicas, and kids. Emily and Linneth took home the puppet making materials from Profesora Judy´s class.

Lizeth Learned to Sew a Quilt with Marian, 2014

Although much of the CdA equipment and supplies went to the new workshop, some was divided between CdA members. Veronica and Nelva each took home one of the portable sewing machines. Of the 5 original CdA chicas, 2 of them are making a living by sewing. They learned at school but used the CdA sewing machines on a regular basis to make their own clothes. Reyna, who spent her senior high school year as the trainer for the CdA chicas is loving life and sewing for a company in Argentina. Lizeth, who wandered away from the Club her junior year and migrated to the city after graduation put in an appearance at the CdA workshop for the first time in 4 years and said, “I am buying an industrial sewing machine so I can work at home, I learned so much here, thank you.” Gabriela, who is studying hair styling in the city, was a CdA chica trainer her senior year. She dropped by for a plier set so she could combine jewelry making techniques she learned from Amanda, founder of Ruraq Maki, with hair adornments she learned how to make from volunteer Michelle Burdette in 2015.

Vero, Nelva, and Jhesica Selected 4 Sewing Patterns to Take Home

The word “democratica” was used many times as the chicas divvied up jewelry making and art supplies. Jhesica received the silkscreening supplies donated by volunteer Surya and the hair adornment supplies. Being cousins and neighbors, she and Nelva worked out an arrangement for sharing Nelva´s sewing machine. Dorinda and Doña Maxima´s will be shopping in Cochabamba next week for a new portable sewing machine for the workshop.

Group Photo, Huancarani, April 2018

The biblioteca (library) was PAZA´s pride and joy. Many of the books had been purchased or donated by the Peace Corps when the Bolivia program closed in 2008. Because the majority of the books were in English concerning development project themes 4 heavy bags and 2 box loads were lugged back to Cochabamba to a former Peace Corps volunteer who works for a youth service learning program and who also has ties to Biblioworks in Sucre. Many children´s books written in Spanish had been donated through the years. Some of those books went to the new workshop and some were divided between the CdA kids whose interest in reading has been sparked by those books. May ownership encourage them to continue to open book covers and disappear into the tales within.

The monthly blog postings will continue with Vilma being the Independencia news correspondent. Thank you Lyn Lucas and Dorothy Thursby for continued support as PAZA works through this transition. Dorinda Dutcher, April 21, 2018

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Preservation of a Weaving Tradition

Lizeth Learning to Warp, 2011

Preservation of their weaving tradition weighs heavy on Doña Máxima and the Huancarani weavers. Many of the ageing weavers taught their daughters as they were taught but only 2 have daughters who live in the area and weave today. The educated youth of the past few generations have fled to the cities upon graduation of high school to pursue more options in life then the brutally physical farmer subsistence lifestyle.

Today´s Club Chicas Learning to Play Scrabble

When PAZA began the Club de Chicas in 2010 the goal was to teach teens to weave. PAZA was selling at craft fairs in Cochabamba three times a year and the teens were motivated to weave to sell. None pursued the craft after high school graduation. The current chicas in the Club don´t even pretend to have an interest in learning to weave. Although many fiber arts and other skills have been taught by volunteers and visitors through the years to Club members and the weavers of Huancarani, the preservation of the weaving tradition remains one of PAZA´s 3 main objectives.

Doña Casirimira at Her Loom, 2010

Preserving the weaving tradition is reaching a critical point. Last month Doña Casimira, formerly a prolific weaver, declined an order confessing that she is no longer up to the physical demands of weaving. All is not lost! Doña Maxima has been approached by young mothers moving into the new neighborhoods springing up in Independencia who want to learn how to weave. The women are so young, semi-literate, de pollera (traditional skirt), and desperate for a means to earn an income to care for their kids. They have moved from their farms to a town that can offer them no work.

Doña Casimira may not be able to weave but she can teach and pass on her wealth of knowledge. PAZA is going to test a bonus program to encourage the master weavers to teach the young women. There will be a bonus paid to each master weaver who works with a younger woman to the point where the new weaver meets the required quality for the yoga mat straps.

Club Dye Day Last Week

The Club de Artesanas is going to undergo major changes to get back to its objective of helping the ageing weavers preserve their textile tradition. The current teen program will end on April 6th. The future changes will be 100% in the hands of Doña Maxima and the 3 remaining core members who are all weavers. They will divide their time between teaching weaving and working on a new product line of fiber arts products other than the traditional weavings that can be sold locally. If they lead, others will follow.

PAZA will continue to pay rent for workshop space evaluating regularly to be able to phase out as the entrepreneurial efforts of the women allow. The space is important because it is also a gathering place/refuge where the women can meet to talk, laugh, support each other, and cry. Doña Maxima will take over management and ownership of the equipment and supplies. Her wage will be reduced to 2 half days in part because the young mothers wanting to learn to weave can’t devote whole days or even whole mornings to attending. The wage reduction is also a compromise between motivation to spark her entrepreneurial streak and to keep the momentum going.

Breny and Don Enrique Modelling Poncho and Aguayo, 2009

These young mothers who are so desperate to find a means to care for their children can be the key to the sustainability of the weaving tradition. Making it all work will take the finesse of a Quechua speaking Bolivian professional. It is serendipity, that Breny Ugarte, who has worked with Doña Máxima and PAZA since 2008 came forth to say she will help because she has other work she will be doing in Independencia

Doña Narciza Weaving, 2014

All looks good on paper, but only time will tell how PAZA will evolve with 100% control of the Independencia activities being under Doña Maxima and the weavers. Future PAZA fundraising requests will only happen upon receipt and approval of funding needs from Doña Maxima, or if the bonus program breaks the bank. Dorinda hopes to return to Independencia for Spinzilla 2019 and to pick up weaving orders hopefully with the team´s new TNNA sponsor who has yet to claim that title. The weavings will continue to trickle to the U.S. thanks to friends traveling between Bolivia and the U.S. Help with sales especially the yoga mat straps is needed. The blog will continue with short monthly updates as to how all is progressing in Independencia, and expect the unexpected. The change is scary, but it will be incredibly empowering for so many rural Bolivian women. Thank you. Dorinda Dutcher, March 29, 2018

A Time of Change

Meeting With Weavers, Huancarani, 2007

PAZA can be divided into 2 distinct phases reckoning back to its birth as a Peace Corps development project in 2007. The project objectives were the same that the weavers of Huancarani had stated as their needs at their first meeting with Dorinda that year.

  1. Preserve the weaving tradition
  2. Rescue natural dye techniques
  3. Access to a foreign market

Rural Workshop#5, Doña Maxima Teaching Color Coordination for warp, 2009

Phase #1 ran from 2007 through 2009 and was a time of collaboration and partnerships forming then falling apart. The Peace Corps left Bolivia in 2008. Dorinda carried on the work on her own partnering with Doña Máxima and they created a series of 5 natural dye workshops in 5 rural communities, barely keeping a step ahead of their students. The local government provided the transportation. A Bolivian non-profit organization began working in Independencia in 2008 and supported the 2 three day intensive dye workshops that grounded those interested in knowledge of local dye plants and the mordanting process.

Phase #2 began in 2010 when all local partnerships ceased due to petty local politics in Independencia. There were a few sleepless nights for Doña Maxima, the weavers of Huancarani, and Dorinda on how to move forward. The Club de Chicas (now Club de Artesanas) rose like a phoenix out of the ashes. Dorinda´s attendance at a Weave a Real Peace (WARP) Conference that year opened the door to a network of support that has flourished into friendships through the years.

1st Craft Fair, Cochabamba, 2009

Phase #1 sorted out the local players. Phase #2 has run for 8 years and has been a focus on training through activities and experiences. Volunteers have offered workshops on all sorts of fiber arts activities. A dye pot failure is just a challenge to be turned into a success. More Huancarani weavers dye small batches on their own for the unique colors they desire in their weavings. Doña Máxima and her daughter Zoraida participated in numerous craft fairs, taking home buyers´ comments to share with the weavers. There was a phase of product design through those years so there would be something new on the vendor table. The weavers formed their first Spinzilla team in 2014, and came to understand the responsibilities of team participation with each passing year. Doña Maxima attended the Tinkuy International Weaving Conference in 2010, in 2013 she did a weaving exhibition, and in 2017 she stood on stage along with Huancarani weaver Doña Justina and made a presentation. When it was over it left PAZA in a state of “now what?”

Volunteer Selina Teaching a Knitting Class, Huancarani, 2013

Change is scary and for PAZA it always comes as the evitable conclusion following sleepless nights. As Maria said in “The Sound of Music”, “where a door closes a window opens”. Forget about a window because the upcoming changes for PAZA will blow open many a door of possibility. Phase #3 will begin in late April. All the years of training in fiber arts skills need to be turned to entrepreneurial efforts. Doña Máxima and the Club women will step up into leadership roles and Dorinda will make a graceful exit and relocate to the U.S., specifically Bozeman, Montana. After a 11 year hiatus it is time for her to go back to work for a wage, and a foreign market for the weavings can be better

Breny Talking With the Weavers, Huancarani, 2010

pursued from the U.S. Long time PAZA collaborator, Breny Ugarte, is a native of Independencia but a Quechua speaking professional with experience working with development projects for women. She is ready, willing, and able to help Doña Maxima and the core Club members leap into the entrepreneurial phase. The traditional weavings don´t sell in Independencia, so having a line of fiber arts products that will sell locally can help more women earn an income. PAZA is leaving the Independencia based activities in good hands.

The Camaraderie of Spinzilla Spinning Week, 2014

There is no word in the English language that can express the deep sense of gratitude to you for your years of support and friendship. It is the goal of development projects to turn the project over to the beneficiaries. PAZA worked without a timeline and the training phase was allowed to run its natural course. Thank you. Dorinda Dutcher, March 29, 2018

WANTED: 2018 TNNA Spinzilla Sponsor

2017 Spinzilla Spinning Week, Huancarani

Please pass the word that the Bolivian team the Warmis Phuskadoras (Women Spinners) is in need of a TNNA sponsor for the 2018 Spinzilla Spinning Week. This is a super opportunity for a TNNA member who has an affinity for the Andean textile traditions. What better way to develop a personal relationship with rural spinners/weavers? Expenses have been met annually thanks to social media help rallying support for the team. Information about the team is archived on the blog during the months of September and October going back to the team’s first competition in 2014. All spinning is done with phuskas (drop spindles) which is a central activity in the fading rural way of life. The Warmis Phuskadoras love competing and socializing during Spinning Week.

If you are interested or would like further information, please contact Dorinda Dutcher who coordinates the team in Bolivia. dkdutcher@hotmail.com. Dorinda Dutcher, February 27, 2018

Fiber Arts February

Jhesica With a Water Color Portrait She Painted

Annual registration for the Club de Artesanas (CdA) is in February after the women and teens settle back into Independencia following Carnaval. The CdA chicas lost teen trainer Abigail who now lives with a family in the city providing child care part time and attending high school. Jhesica who will turn 16 this year has begun her second year as a teen trainer and was thrilled to receive a wage increase.  Each of the 3 teens from last year invited a younger friend to join and many bring young siblings so there is a lot of youthful exuberance on Saturdays.

Adviana & Her 2 Youngest During 2017 Spinning Week

The CdA women will miss Adviana who has been a devoted member since 2012. She and her family migrated to the city during the vacation. She entered the Club as a timid 17 year old mother and through the years she learned to weave and was completing orders regularly to earn income to care for her 3 little ones. It was mainly because of her that the waiting list was added so more spinners could enjoy Spinzilla Spinning Week in 2017. She begged to spin, but not being up to speed with the older women the wait list was implemented to accommodate and encourage her and 2 other young spinners. May her self confidence that grew through the years of CdA activities and with the support and friendship of the other Club women enable her to transition successfully to life in the city.

Surya, Teens & Their Siblings Posing with Printed T-Shirts

Club attendance was low in February because of women and teens spending much of the month in their rural communities. That allowed Surya, the visiting artist, to work one on one with Club members as well as with groups. Doña Máxima learned to embroider in primary school and on her first embroidered piece working with Surya she learned new stitches but her designs continued to be just outlines. On her second piece she made the leap to use newly learned stitches to fill in her designs and kept then kept stopping to admire and show off the results.

Dye Day Results

Surya taught two of the teens how to use the sewing machine, including using the instruction book as a resource when there is a question or problem. Nelva had finished a beaded embroidery piece under Suyra’s tutelage which she sewed into a bag. Veronica learned to sew by making a small shoulder bag with a button closure and a zippered pencil bag. The teens also learned about perspective in drawing and had fun with water colors. Suyra had brought all the supplies to teach screen printing and worked with the teens for 2 months ending with the final project of a printed t-shirt.

Surya at the Loom

The weavers of Huancarani began dropping off skeins to be dyed as rainy season is dye season. The Club held a dye day to take care of the accumulating skeins from the Huancarani weavers. The dye pot of suyku leaves produced light and dark greens skeins. Fresh turmeric root had been purchased from a sidewalk vendor in Cochabamba in October, and although roots were beginning to sprout once mashed up one dye pot of vibrant orange skeins was produced. The turmeric pot was mixed into the fifth dye bath of cochineal to dye skeins a rich dark orange.

Embroidery Projects… Notice Use of Weaving and Thrums on Surya’s Piece

Surya taught a batik workshop to Vilma and Doña Maxima and they experimented on cotton cloth, silk scarves, and cotton t-shirts with varying degrees of success. The leftover dye pot of the turmeric and cochineal was almost exhausted so further experimentation will take place with stronger dye pots on the upcoming dye days.

Doña Maxima´s 2nd Work with Filled-In Designs & Another of Suyra’s Fun Contemporary Pieces

Surya, is the second volunteer in 8 years to take advanced classes from Doña Maxima and complete a weaving on the loom. She is the first volunteer to weave the cloth, strap, and border to assemble a ch´upsita (small shoulder bag). It is surprising there are not more weavers who have visited to take classes with Doña Máxima to learn traditional Andean weaving techniques. Surya taught embroidery stitches and worked on her own pieces for an exhibition at the Kiosko Galería in Santa Cruz Bolivia beginning on March 15th. She cunningly incorporated an end piece of her weaving and used the thrums as embroidery threads, which was a tug of war with each one because of their rough texture. However, the results were stunning with the natural dyed wool blending together for a natural looking portrait.

Surya Explaining How Her Visit Influenced Her Art Which Will be Exhibited

The PAZA order that will be traveling to the U.S. the end of April is almost complete. It is a bit early to be without an order for the weavers, so any preorders for the woven cloth which are the fajas (70” x 5” bands, $38), weavings (63” x 9.5”, $68), zippered pouches ($16), zippered pouches with a wrist strap ($17), or yoga mat straps ($22/$23) will enable additional orders to be placed over the next 2 months. The sizing may seem odd, but the weavers work in centimeters not inches, well except for Doña Dionicia who at 86 years of age gets away with using hand spans instead of a measuring tape. The weavings that are 63” x 9.5” were sized to be cut up to make 6 zippered bags. If you need a different sized weaving for a project you may place a special order. Contact Dorinda at dkdutcher@hotmail.com for further information or to place an order. Dorinda Dutcher, February 27, 2018

The Weavings of February

Musicians in Bayeta Pants Sporting Chulos, Chuspitas, and Aguayos

There was just a week between the beginning of the academic year and returning to vacation mode for the week of Carnaval. The Independencia Carnaval parade and dance competition is the best time to view traditional weavings. The traditional clothing is loosely woven wool (bayeta cloth) pants for the men and polleras (skirts) for the women. Last July, when asked about what topics to include in the Tinkuy presentation the women of Huancarani began talking about bayeta and their youth that preceded purchased ready to wear clothing. The men constructed the looms and wove the cloth. The women spun cotton for the heddle strings, which was the only time they spun cotton. Finding an example of a loom to take photos has so far proven elusive because of the tradition of burning the possessions of an individual upon their death.

New Carnaval Entry, The Peaked Chulos are Not Local

The small chuspitas (shoulder bags) served as pockets for the men to carry coca leaf, which most still chew when working in the fields as well as being part of Andean rituals. The chuspitas for celebrations such as Carnaval are always woven with brightly dyed acrylic yarn often with embedded double weave designs on the bag and the strap. A few of the male musicians sported old fajas (belts) of double weave. The male musicians and female dancers all wore aguayos (square cloth for carrying loads on one’s back) and the majority of them appeared to be the 2 piece handwoven aguayos as opposed to the one piece inexpensive factory made aguayo. The competing rural communities had around 20 minutes to play the piercingly shrill music and dance in the plaza for the judges, authorities and spectators.

Warming Up to Strike

This year all were treated to a new entry. Five men walked into the plaza in traditional clothing playing instruments. One had a pile of purple, red, and pink dyed sheep skins on his back. Hmmmm, very curious….  After a short interview in Quechua with a radio reporter the man bearing the sheepskins hefted them onto his head. One of his companions unwound a coil of unskinned leather from his waist. It was like a whip except for the small basket woven onto the end containing rocks. After a few overhead lasso type swings the basket of rocks

The Strike

smacked into the sheepskins. When the rock slinger missed he took the sheepskins to protect his head so that his friend could demonstrate his skill aiming and striking with the rock ended whip. Slings were the preferred weapons of the Incas and today a braided llama fiber sling can usually be spotted in the waistband of a rural woman out pasturing her sheep. Doña Maxima remembers that when she was a girl in Huancarani  slings were one of the trade items that the highland traders would bring when they arrived with their llama trains to trade for corn.

With a Big Smile Doña Maxima Poses with Her Aguayo

During Carnaval week, Doña Maxima was thrilled to finally finish the aguayo she began 10 months ago in the hope that it would debut at the Tinkuy last November. The weaving was slow going and she lamented more than once that she wished she had begun with just one column of embedded double weave designs in each half instead of two. The photo shows the 4 columns of embedded double weave design with the decorative stitch that joins the two woven halves of the aguayo together. She learned the technique from her mother-in-law and sister-in-law when she moved into their house with her husband at age 16. She said they were a family of weavers and she felt obligated to improve her weaving to their level.

The 4 Columns of Embedded Double Weave

A local non-profit organization that had partnered with Independencia´s cultural center held their 1st Feria of Artesanía Nativa in the plaza last Sunday. In January free acrylic yarn was handed out through the Organizations of Women in many communities and the Feria was an exhibition and sales opportunity for the results of the weaving with that yarn. The brightly colored made in China yarn was considered “gold” when it first made its appearance and began replacing the handspun aniline dyed local wool. Now the bright happy colors are considered traditional for Carnaval and other celebrations so there is a local market. Four of the Huancarani weavers

Feria of Weavings with Acrylic Yarn, Doña Justina is Smiling at the Far Right

had a table including Doña Justina who went to the Tinkuy. Her sales technique on her home ground was much more animated and she was pleased to have sold a belt and a chulo (Andean knitted cap with ear flaps). One observation was the low number of participants which could be a stark indication of the dwindling number of rural weavers.

The non-profit organization had approached PAZA about collaborating, but there would have been an unrealistic expectation for PAZA to provide the market. Looking back on 11 years of sales and marketing successes and failures PAZA is wary of partnering with any organization lacking sales experience. It was heartening to see an effort being made locally to support the rural weavers. Dorinda Dutcher, February 26, 2018

Annual Meeting & Spinzilla Celebration

Hauling Meat Tray to the Oven

The annual Centro de Artesanía, Huancarani (CAH) meeting and Spinzilla Celebration were held outside under brooding clouds. Once again, Doña Toribia donated her wood burning oven and it was fired up before the contingent from Independencia arrived with the 49 pounds of beef cutlets, a first time veggie option, tomatoes, oil, condiments, and sodas for the feast.  Weavers arrived singly or in pairs dragging branches for firewood or with an aguayo filled with just harvested potatoes or onions. Doña Toribia donated iceberg lettuce for the salad which is rarely seen and never for sale in the Independencia market. All set about prepping the food and laying it in metal trays. Branches of the

Mudding the Wood Burning Oven Closed

th’ola shrub were cut and tied to a branch to sweep the oven´s brick bottom clear of ash. Potatoes were tossed inside, the trays were set on top of them, and the oven cover which had been fashioned from the end of a metal 55 gallon drum was sealed shut with mud.

The women settled on the ground for the annual CAH meeting with one eye on the rain falling in the mountains to the south. A new Board of Directors was elected, Doña Justina stepped down as President after 4 years of doing an excellent job of coordinating with PAZA for workshops, meetings, and Spinzilla activities. Twenty year old Maribel took over as Secretary, because she can read and write she will set an example for the future of that Board position. Two new members joined CAH and both are younger than the median age of 60 for the members.

2018 Annual CAH Meeting, Huancarani

The weavers voted to establish an “honorable member” category to waive the annual membership fee for elderly women who no longer spin or weave but enjoy the social occasions the CAH offers. Doña Teodora, who hasn´t woven in decades because of a poorly healed broken shoulder, was CAH´s first honorary member.The new CAH banner was unveiled and all declared it to be beautiful. The intent was to have it made in time to take to the Tinkuy, but the 2 piece pole was so long that it was impractical for travel. It will be marched around the soccer field in Huancarani in the civic day parades.

Doña Teodora with her Photogenic Smile

The vote was unanimous to continue competing in Spinzilla Spinning Week. They asked, “Why wouldn´t we? We spin almost every day anyway and we like winning a prize”. They voted to raise their registration fee 5 Bs. from $1.44 to $2.16 per participant.

The New CAH Banner

Time was spent discussing whether or not to raise the price of the weavings and a vote for a small increase was passed. Thanks to Laverne Waddington the fajas (4-1/2” x 71” bands) are gaining popularity with U.S. weavers who purchase them to design and cut up for their own projects. The 2018 price was raised from $35 to $38. The price for a kilo of handspun yarn went from $10 to $11.50.

Viewing the Tinkuy Photos

Doña Máxima and Doña Justina spoke about their Tinkuy experiences and photos were passed around. The women were able to put a face with the name they hear many times during Spinzilla and that person is Marilyn Murphy of Cloth Roads who has sponsored the Bolivian team for 4 years. There were also photos of Doña Máxima and Doña Justina presenting thank you weavings to longtime supporters Lyn Lucas and Dorothy Thursby. The photo of Karen Sprenger at the exhibition table with Doña Justina and Doña Maxima was appropriate because she´s been instrumental in helping with sales of the inventory stored in Kansas.

Doña Narciza Receives Her Shawl and Spinzilla Photo

The meeting adjourned and the moment all had been waiting for arrived with the handing out of the shawls, the 2017 Spinzilla prize for all participants. Doña Máxima and her daughter Zoraida had selected and purchased the cloth in Cochabamba. The material was divided between Zoraida and the CdA members so they could earn a wage by crocheting the borders and adding fringe, thus personalizing each shawl. Unfortunately, a group photo was not taken because the wind picked up and the clouds had darkened.

The 1 hour and 40 minute meeting coincided with the exact time needed for all to be pulled out of the oven cooked to perfection. Many of the women bagged up their meal and headed home hoping to stay ahead of the rain. The meal was a hurried affair as the rain rolled implacably towards the group. In the end all scurried to clean up and head home. Doña Narciza commented a few weeks later that the new shawls came in handy as a warm layer against the cold rain for her and her neighbors who had a long trek home. Thanks again to everyone who supported the Bolivian Spinzilla team! Dorinda Dutcher, January 8th, 2018